Skip to content

A New Year, A New Blog – Welcome to the Quattrocentrist

January 5, 2012
Madonna of the Magnificat, c. 1483-85 by Sandro Botticelli (Uffizi Museum, Florence) Mary, or may not, be a portrait of Lucrezia Tournabuoni (1425 –1482), mother of Lorenzo di Medici. As my Roman friends say....it may as well be so.

At the end of 2011 I bid a fond farewell to Musematic a museum informatics and technology blog.  For six years I faithfully blogged about things technological and not-so-technological (http://musematic.net/author/hwitchey/) for MCN and M&T.

For the past couple of years I’ve moved slowly away from new media issues and concerns and am once again navigating a course through history and art history and I needed a place to write and explore ideas.  Fifteenth century Florentine art was my first love as an art history student, and I’m back teaching a class on the topic this semester hence the title for this blog “The Quattrocentrist.”

The fifteenth century stuff will no doubt be the main topic of this blog but as an independent scholar I have a lot of irons in the fire right now so I might blog about Americans traveling in Europe in the 19th century, museum studies, ethics, conversational Italian, books, or Joe Cocktail.  Joe is the curator/hero of my first attempt at writing a mystery, set in an art museum of course.

Lucrezia Tournabuoni–who may or may not be the model for Mary in the Botticelli painting — was a scholar-mum and an outstanding multi-tasker.  So with Lucrezia as my role model for today, I bid you arrivederci a tutti.

Madonna of the Magnificat, c. 1483-85 by Sandro Botticelli (Uffizi Museum, Florence) Mary, or may not, be a portrait of Lucrezia Tournabuoni (1425 –1482), mother of Lorenzo di Medici. As my Roman friends say....it may as well be so.

Madonna of the Magnificat, c. 1483-85 by Sandro Botticelli (Uffizi Museum, Florence) Mary, or may not, be a portrait of Lucrezia Tournabuoni (1425 –1482), mother of Lorenzo di Medici. As my Roman friends say....it may as well be so.

Advertisements

From → Uncategorized

2 Comments
  1. Nancy-Clay Marsteller, Ph.D> permalink

    So glad you are back to your true calling- enlightening others! This is so exciting and I can’t wait to stay abreast of your research as I hate reading your diaries. Just don’t blog too much on Madonnas and fat babies.

  2. Now in my golden years I have more of an affinity for the big Madonnas than the big babies. Thanks for the comment, NCM.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: